Josh Tolley Gets the Real Story on How Refugees Are Vetted — The Beltway Times

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The official story about how the vetting process works for refugees is that it takes several months and those entering the country are ran through databases and screened before being accepted. In an interview with Josh Tolley, Jill Noble of Missouri, tells a different story. Last year, she began attending UN refugee resettlement meetings, which were sponsored by Missouri Social Services.

She says that there is not an additional vetting process once refugees are in the United States. They arrive with no paperwork, so the paper trail begins after they are picked up from the airport. Refugees names are written as “FNU,” which stands for “full name unknown,” when a language barrier prevents agency workers from obtaining the refugee’s name. Those with names are issued Social Security numbers and passports immediately. The agencies then assist refugees in finding compatriots, which facilitates the refugees not assimilating into our culture. Once they have identification, the agencies assist them with finding entitlement benefits that they qualify for such as housing and welfare. The agencies are also supposed to help refugees find jobs.

Once in Missouri, Noble claims that few seek employment because the medical review team tries to identify them in a way that will qualify them for long-term Social Security disability benefits. It is a routine part of the screening to ask if they have frequent headaches or back problems that might help them qualify.

Noble says the agencies that facilitate refugees are receiving $25,000 just for picking them up from the airport and processing them. She says that additional money flows into the agencies in the form of block grants.

States like Tennessee and Texas that choose not to officially accept refugees only means that the states themselves do not process refugees. The state’s decision can be circumvented by the Wilson/Fish program. This program allows the states to be bypassed so that money for resettlement goes directly to third-party agencies. The disadvantage to this is that when states no longer process refugees, then they have no data about how many are coming in, who they are, or where they settle.

The complete interview with Josh Tolley can be seen on YouTube. For more of his work, please visit his website at www.JoshTolley.com, like The Josh Tolley Show on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.

  • Tina

    This seems odd. Maybe it varies state to state. When I volunteered for the IRC in Virginia the refugee families were provided a social worker for the first year or so and almost immediately the head of the family was placed in a job, usually a temporary one with potential to become permanent. After either 6 or 8 months they would begin repaying the government for travel expenses and initial rent help, including the ride from the airport. For a couple, this expense usually added up to about 8,000. They initially are provided with SNAP cards but, of course, once they make enough (which happens quickly once they work full time) those benefits end. All families were provided with free english and assimilation classes and the option for a volunteer tutor and family mentor.

    Maybe my area just does a really good job with all of it but I do know that they are required to repay the government once they find steady work. Most areas have programs to become a family mentor to refugees which is a really great way to teach our culture and expectations in America. Catholic Charities and IRC are two that are country wide. We also have a really neat local one run by teacher volunteers. Personally, I have had such a wonderful experience with refugees and have made some life long friends in the mentor program. So many sad stories and heartbreak I could never imagine as an American. I assume, though, not every city does as great of a job as mine. It’s too bad because great volunteer organizations and steady work can make a world of difference!

    • josco

      I’m guessing that a number of aspects direct how these programs work.
      I’ve worked with Chaldeans from Iraq. I’ve been quite impressed with them. They’re hard-working, smart-come from Christian background (although the usual anti-religious views prevail, so many lose their faith in college)
      Muslims, with their affiliation with CAIR, means some hostility and manipulation will likely occur. “Hijab pull” and all.
      Many fine people.
      The Muslims are not as clear-cut. They can be much more difficult to work with, but I’m in academic world so it’s never all that bad. Just don’t see much integration w/other students. Students will MARCH when CAIR deems it necessary but not nec hang with Muslims.

  • Tiger184

    few seek employment because the medical review team tries to identify them in a way that will qualify them for long-term Social Security disability benefits. It is a routine part of the screening to ask if they have frequent headaches or back problems that might help them qualify.”

    This is outrageous!
    We have a family member that is truly disabled, has been a taxpayer all his working life, and was denied disability benefits.